Man Asks Women To Rate His Dating Skills With An Exit Survey

Man Asks Women To Rate His Dating Skills With An Exit Survey

A New York City tech worker has taken his dating game to the next level by asking the women he goes out with to rate his skills on an exit survey. Devon Loucks, 27, a program manager at Google, gives dates a four-page survey on which they can share their thoughts about how the date went.

  1. Loucks decided a scientific approach to dating was the way to go. After becoming frustrated with the NY dating scene following a move from San Francisco, Loucks figured his journey for love had to change. “I’ve created this survey to help reflect on our dating experience and allow you the chance to pinpoint highlights and lowlights throughout our time together,” his survey says.
  2. Women rate the dates on a scale of one to five. Loucks’ exit survey consists of 10 questions and statements in which women can rate how much they enjoyed the dates on a scale. He even asks for feedback on more specific details of their time together, such as the things they talked about, how his hosting skills were, or why they didn’t want to go back to his appointment.
  3. He’s received a mix response to the survey. “Some girls didn’t like the idea of a survey at all,” he told The Post. “Others were like, ‘Oh, my God, this is iconic.'” Some of the feedback he gets can be brutal, such as one woman who complained about being taken to a noisy bar. “You took me to a f—ing hole in the wall. Why would any girl want to go there on a first date?” she responded. Yikes!
  4. The feedback helps Loucks widen his horizons. After receiving the complaint about his first date venue choice from that woman, he “started branching out,” taking dates to “art museums, any events that were going on in New York, and picnic dates.”
  5. Loucks has now been dating one woman for the past few weeks. She filled out one of his surveys after the first date, saying that being asked to give feedback is ultimately what convinced her to go out with him again. It just made me realize you cared enough about the date to want feedback about it,” she said.
Jennifer Still is a writer and editor with more than 10 years of experience. The managing editor of Bolde, she has bylines in Vanity Fair, Business Insider, The New York Times, Glamour, Bon Appetit, and many more.