People Who Are Two-Faced Usually Display These Behaviors

People Who Are Two-Faced Usually Display These Behaviors

Ever had a friend who’s all smiles to your face, then tears you down behind your back? Those are classic signs of someone who’s two-faced. Learning to spot the subtle (and not-so-subtle) warning signs can help you steer clear of these toxic personalities and protect yourself from their manipulative games.

1. Their fakeness is disarming. 

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Two-faced people can be super charming. They’re friendly, funny, and seem genuinely interested in you… at first. But that friendly act is how they reel you in. Their ultimate goal is to use you for their own gain, and they know being likable makes that easier. Sadly, their kindness isn’t genuine, it’s a tool for manipulation.

2. They bend the rules to suit themselves. 

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Two-faced people only care about themselves. They’ll put on a show of being morally upstanding when it benefits them, but those “values” go out the window when it’s inconvenient. They’ll twist things to justify any bad behavior, leaving you feeling betrayed and confused by their hypocrisy.

3. Their compassion is an act. 

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They seem nice, but deep down, two-faced people couldn’t care less about how you feel. They’ll say the right things, but their empathy is an act. Behind those reassuring words, they’re just looking for a way to use your emotions to their advantage.

4. They play people like chess pieces. 

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Two-faced people are always scheming. They carefully plan how to manipulate you and others for their own gain. They don’t care about the friendships they ruin or the conflicts they create; they’re cold, calculating, and ruthlessly effective in achieving their goals.

5. Their lies become their truth.

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Two-faced people spin elaborate lies to get what they want. They’ll play the victim, exaggerate details, and manipulate your emotions to make you believe them. It’s hard to separate what’s real and what’s made up when they’re so convincing, and that’s the whole point.

6. They’re driven by agendas. 

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Two-faced people are obsessed with getting ahead, no matter who they hurt along the way. They want power, attention, and anything else that feeds their ego. They’ll step on anyone to get what they want, and they don’t care about the friendships they ruin.

7. They have convenient amnesia. 

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Two-faced people never take the blame for anything. They’ll deny they ever said something, break promises without apology, and generally act like they have no responsibility for their actions. They twist the past to fit their narrative, and never let the truth get in the way of getting what they want.

8. They’re masters of deflection.

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When a two-faced person gets caught being awful, their first instinct is to blame someone else. They’ll make excuses, twist the truth, and try to pin their mess on anyone but themselves. They know if they can pass the blame, they can often get away with bad behavior.

9. They’re social chameleons.

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Two-faced people can change who they seem to be at the drop of a hat. They’re nice to your face, then talk trash behind your back. They change their personality to fit in with different people, all to advance their own agenda. It makes it hard to know who they really are, which is exactly how they want it.

10. They use flattery as a weapon. 

serious blonde woman outside

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Two-faced people will shower you with fake compliments to get something out of you. Their praise is calculated, not genuine. They want to manipulate you with those sweet words, so be wary of anyone who suddenly starts acting like your biggest fan.

11. Their loyalty is questionable at best. 

serious man sitting in office

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A two-faced person’s loyalty only lasts as long as it’s convenient for them. They’ll swear they’re your best friend, then turn around and stab you in the back the moment it benefits them. They can’t be trusted, and they leave a string of betrayed friendships behind them.

12. They have superficial closeness. 

Young thoughtful businessman in suit opening a door and looking around hotel room

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They’re incapable of true closeness. They pretend to care, but deep down they’re afraid of getting emotionally attached. They keep you at a distance so they maintain control, and can walk away the moment someone needs something from them in return.

13. They’re only honest when they stand to gain something from it. 

Man looking serious at the camera while standing in front of a group of people. Team and leadership concept.

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They’re always trying to control how other people see them and the situation. So, they cherry-pick what they tell you, bending the truth to paint themselves in the best possible light. It’s hard to know what’s real and what’s made up with these people, which is exactly how they like it.

14. They have disposable connections. 

Portrait of a serious mid adult woman at home

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These people don’t have real friendships. They see everyone as a tool they can use and then discard when something better comes along. They only stick around as long as you’re doing favors for them, and they vanish the second they can’t get anything out of you.

15. They betray friends on a whim. 

serious man sitting on table

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Two-faced people are always looking for an angle. They’ll play nice until the perfect opportunity comes along to stab someone in the back. They switch teams constantly, leaving hurt and confused people wondering what happened.

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Piper Ryan is a NYC-based writer and matchmaker who works to bring millennials who are sick of dating apps and the bar scene together in an organic and efficient way. To date, she's paired up more than 120 couples, many of whom have gone on to get married. Her work has been highlighted in The New York Times, Time Out New York, The Cut, and many more.

In addition to runnnig her own business, Piper is passionate about charity work, advocating for vulnerable women and children in her local area and across the country. She is currently working on her first book, a non-fiction collection of stories focusing on female empowerment.
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