South Carolina Introduces Law To Bring Back Firing Squad For Death Row Inmates

The state of South Carolina has introduced new legislation that will force death row inmates to choose between the electric chair or firing squad as a mode of execution. While lethal injection would still be the first choice when it comes to ending a prisoner’s life, if the drugs needed to take the more humane route (if such a thing is even possible when we’re talking about the death penalty) were unavailable at the time, the other options would then be on the table.

  1. South Carolina governor Henry McMaster signed the bill into law. South Carolina has had a 10-year stay on executions due to a shortage of lethal injection drugs. Three inmates due to die within that period have not yet been executed as they chose not to die via electric chair and lethal injection was the only other option, according to ABC News. However, McMaster believes reintroducing the firing squad will solve the issue.
  2. If lethal injection drugs aren’t available, inmates will be forced to choose. If there continues to be a shortage of lethal injection drugs available, prisoners will no longer have the luxury of having their execution stayed. The State reports that moving forward, the inmate will be forced to choose between the electric chair or the firing squad as their way to die.
  3. McMaster believes this is the best way to bring criminals to justice. In a Twitter post after signing the legislation, McMaster wrote: “This weekend, I signed legislation into law that will allow the state to carry out a death sentence. The families and loved ones of victims are owed closure and justice by law. Now, we can provide it.”
  4. Understandably, most think the law is absolutely barbaric. As one Twitter user responded: “They are not owed a firing squad nor that another person be murdered. Jesus spoke against an eye for an eye and he was for forgiveness. Murdering another person violently is not the path to peace nor the sign of an environment, atmosphere that is healthy if you are playing God.” Another added: “How is ending another human life providing closure to anyone? It doesn’t bring anyone back or undo anything that was done. Our justice system is not perfect, and the chance of even one an innocent person being put to death is too much of a chance.”

This isn’t the first controversial law passed by McMaster. Earlier this year, he passed a law banning abortions in the state. However, only a day later, the law was suspended by a federal judge.

Jennifer has been the managing editor of Bolde since its launch in 2014. Before that, she was the founding editor of HelloGiggles and also worked as an entertainment writer for Bustle and Digital Spy. Her work has been published in Bon Appetit, Decider, Vanity Fair, The New York TImes, and many more.
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