Men Named Ben Are Having Their Lives Ruined By TikTok

TikTok pretty much controls everything in life at the moment, from calling out gym creeps to complaining about boyfriend air and using the triangle method to find love. Dating and relationship issues are big topics on the app. And men named Ben have it pretty tough right now, thanks to TikTok popularizing the “Ben Stage.” Poor Bens!

So, what’s it all about? The Ben Stage became a thing when TikTok user @iamgubste posted a video saying that “you’d better run” if you’ve been through the phase yourself. While that’s pretty vague, it made sense to the more than 1.4 million people who liked it and the more than 70,000 people who commented.

“My Ben stage left me in therapy,” one TikTok user commented. “My dad’s name is Ben… he’s on his third wife,” another said. In other words, the people who know, know. However, not everyone really understood the significance. Turns out, they should count themselves lucky.

What is the “Ben Stage” on TikTok, anyway?

@iamgubster

♬ original sound – yelenabelovasnewvest🍉🍒🥝

If you’re not quite sure what the Ben Stage is all about, it’s basically just a popularization of the idea of dating the same kind of guy over and over again. It’s not necessarily about all men named Ben being toxic. Ben’s just a name used to represent these kinds of partners who are really no good.

Sadly, the Ben Stage going around TikTok has left a few Bens feeling bad. Some women who are in relationships with men named Ben have even taken to the platform to share their partners’ reaction to the slandering. Thankfully, most of them seem to be taking it in their stride.

Obviously, there’s no reason to avoid men named Ben based on a silly TikTok trend. However, you’d do well to avoid any guy who seems toxic, regardless of what his name might be.

@zoe_simp5on

she should save herself while she can 😭🤪 #foryou #viral #trending

♬ original sound – yelenabelovasnewvest🍉🍒🥝

Jennifer has been the managing editor of Bolde since its launch in 2014. Before that, she was the founding editor of HelloGiggles and also worked as an entertainment writer for Bustle and Digital Spy. Her work has been published in Bon Appetit, Decider, Vanity Fair, The New York TImes, and many more.