The UK Now Recognizes Love Bombing As A Sign Of Abuse

When you’re actively dating and looking for a partner to potentially be with forever, it can feel heady and amazing to find that the person you like seems to really like you too. They’re attentive, reassuring, and extremely demonstrative about their feelings. There’s just one problem: They seem a little too into you, especially so soon. Love bombing, when a person bombards you with intense words and gestures to the point that it feels overwhelming, is extremely harmful, and now the UK’s Crown Prosecution Service is recognizing it as the sign of abuse that it is.

The CPS issued guidance to include love bombing as a sign of coercive and controlling behavior in romantic relationships, saying that those who are guilty of this “intermittently do what appears to be loving acts” in order to cover up or make up for sustained abuse.

According to the guidance, prosecutors dealing with abuse cases should consider whether love bombing is part of an ongoing course of conduct. This means determining whether love bombing behavior in any way impacted the victim negatively or altered the way they lived their lives as a result.

Chief Crown Prosecutor Kate Brown, national lead for abuse at the CPS, said in a statement (via Sky News): “Our prosecutors consider all the evidence, including how a suspect’s actions have impacted the victim, to build a picture of their manipulative behavior and present a robust case in court.”

“These controlling offenses can quickly escalate and that is why we’re absolutely committed to prosecuting wherever our legal test is met and will always seek out relevant orders to protect victims.”

“Bringing offenders of violence against women and girls to justice is our priority and we are working hard to drive improvements for victims of these crimes.”

This is certainly a step in the right direction and should be considered by other countries, including the US. We need to spot and stop love bombing before it becomes even more toxic.

Jennifer has been the managing editor of Bolde since its launch in 2014. Before that, she was the founding editor of HelloGiggles and also worked as an entertainment writer for Bustle and Digital Spy. Her work has been published in Bon Appetit, Decider, Vanity Fair, The New York TImes, and many more.
close-link
close-link
close-link
close-link