Patient Charged $40 For Crying During Doctor’s Appointment

A New York woman revealed her shock to discover her sister had reportedly been charged $40 extra “for crying” during a doctor’s appointment. Camille Johnson, a 25-year-old YouTuber, shared a photo of her younger sister’s medical bill and revealed how the inappropriate charges came about.

  1. Camille’s sister had been “struggling” lately. She has a health condition that requires ongoing care that she hasn’t been able to get. It’s no wonder, then, that she became emotional. when she eventually got an appointment. “My little sister has been really struggling with a health condition lately and finally got to see a doctor. They charged her $40 for crying,” Camille wrote. The charge on the bill claimed it was for a “BRIEF EMOTIONAL/BEHAV ASSMT.”
  2. The younger woman was understandably upset during her appointment. As Camille explained, her sister’s “rare disease” means she’s often left in the lurch when it comes to proper treatment. Because of this, she “got emotional because she feels frustrated and helpless.”
  3. No behavior assessment was done, according to Camille. While the bill claims the $40 charge was for a behavior assessment, no such thing took place, Camille claims. “One tear in and they charged her $40 without addressing why she is crying, trying to help, doing any evaluation, any prescription, nothing.” She also pointed out that this so-called assessment cost even more than a vision test, a blood capillary draw, and a hemoglobin test, among other things.
  4. What is a behavioral assessment anyway? It’s something doctors use to assess mental health issues and look for signs of ADHD, anxiety, depression, substance abuse, or suicide risk. It’s been used since at least 2015. However, Camille says her sister was never evaluated at all – the doctor allegedly saw her tears but said nothing. “They did not evaluate her for depression or other mental illnesses, nor did they discuss her mental health with her,” she told The Independent. “She never talked to a specialist, was not referred to anyone, not prescribed anything, and they did nothing to assist with her mental health.”
  5. While Camille’s sister can afford the $40, it’s not about the price. It’s about treating patients with more care and consideration. “We need a drastic change in the healthcare industry, and I thought that sharing a real-life story online would be a good way to open up the conversation and help advocate for change,” Camille said. “I really hope this tweet can incite improvement in our healthcare system as well as be a warning for the future.”

Jennifer has been the managing editor of Bolde since its launch in 2014. Before that, she was the founding editor of HelloGiggles and also worked as an entertainment writer for Bustle and Digital Spy. Her work has been published in Bon Appetit, Decider, Vanity Fair, The New York TImes, and many more.
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